It’s a Blur

Alliance, Nebraska. Cloudy and sputtering rain and wind and temperatures changing every few minutes.

Bear Lake Park last day 001Usually, when rv-ing somewhere, I have maps and photos to help me keep track of where I have been and where I am going.   I write leisurely stories with pretty pictures that remind me of our tours and travels and have fun doing it.  At the moment, at the Sunset Motel and RV Park in Alliance, Nebraska, the last four days are just one big happy blur. 

Day 7 (23)We were camping in one spot, driving nowhere in the MoHo, and five rigs and several tents filled up the group site at Bear Lake Regional Park near Morrison, Colorado, within site of just the tips of the red rocks of Red Rocks Amphitheater.  I took literally hundreds of photos, mostly of family, and many duplicates of group shots trying to get all those faces turned toward me and everyone’s eyes actually open.  I have managed to keep up with photo processing, but I have a feeling that the Verizon signal in this remote little Nebraska town isn’t exactly photo friendly.

Colorado to Nebraska (7)I did think it might be nice to throw in an update for friends checking in, so here it is, sans photos.  We are fine.  We had breakfasts, and dinners out, and bike rides and some kayaking, and walking and laughing but no campfires.  In spite of that, we managed S’mores over the bbq grill for some city kids who experienced them for the first time. 

Today as we left Colorado, I stopped in Sterling to see my grandson, married there just last September.  Our big group has dropped to just two rigs, with Roger and Nancy parked beside us and ready for our travels to South Dakota tomorrow.  I’ll try for some photos, but in case it doesn’t work, at least you know we are no longer out of touch. There will always be time later to catch up and write about  everything in more detail

Map Rock Springs to Alliance Nebraska

Overnight camp south of I-80 Angel Creek

We are now at the Rock Springs, Wyoming KOA

Angel lake Road from Wells, Nevada south toward the Ruby MountainsWith a short day of driving, we arrived at our planned night stop in Wells, Nevada rather early in the afternoon.  The temperatures were still hot, and the parking lot at the Flying J, while big and fairly empty, left much to be desired in the way of ambience.  Instead, we fired up the CampWhere app and discovered a couple of forest service campgrounds just 8 miles or so south of town.

Map Angel Creek CampgroundIt helps to see the area on google maps, and see if the road into the east side of the Ruby Mountains looked passable.  It also helped that one of the campgrounds had a size limit for motorhomes of 45 feet. Surely with a limit that high, the road must be OK.  The higher elevation campground at Angel Lake has a 30 foot limit and we discussed the possibility of trying that one out. 

storm toward the east from Angel lake Road from Wells, Nevada south toward the Ruby MountainsDriving the Angel Lake road was completely manageable as far as the Angel Creek Campground turnoff, and still a bit undecided we thought we would check out the campground before attempting to drive higher.  I said, “Let’s just be safe and unhook before we go up this steep, winding road!”  Mo agreed wholeheartedly as we looked up along the ridge to see something that looked like it might be the highway.

The campground was delightful, with 18 sites, some too short for even our rig, and yet a few here and there that were plenty long for even the biggest rigs.  The camp hostess was a delightful young woman living in a tent shelter with a nice big German shepherd companion.  When we asked her about the Angel Creek Road she said without hesitation that we probably didn’t want to take our motorhome up there.

one heck of a scary road to Angel Lake, so glad we didn't take the MoHoWe settled into our site, paid the half price fee of $6. with our senior pass, and unhooked the baby car for a trip up the mountain.  Within a few hundred yards we were quite happy that we didn’t have the motorhome.  The road is incredibly steep and the drop-offs to the valley below are hair-raising, at least for me, and even in the baby car I found myself leaning inward to supposedly avoid going over the edge.

Angel Lake in the Ruby MountainsOn our way up the mountain, a huge cloud of smoke from some far distant fires darkened the skies and with the added storminess, the final view of the small lake itself was a bit of an anticlimax.  It certainly didn’t make us want to pull off the kayaks and jump in.  We didn’t even pay the parking fee to let Abby go swimming, since all seemed a bit dingy and uninviting.  The Angel Lake campground was a big surprise, however, with several really big rigs tucked into low shrubs and uneven sites with no actual view of the tiny lake.  Sometimes these really high elevation lakes don’t invite me that much, they seem harsh and barren and inhospitable. 

storm from Angel Lake RoadIn contrast, our little camp at Angel Creek seemed lovely even with the stormy clouds hovering and the smoke coming and going on the winds.  Dinner was a simple quesadilla and a walk around the campground afterward made for a lovely ending to the day.  We were in bed at a ridiculously early hour, with the wind blowing and rain spattering the roof now and then.  With no hookups, but plenty of stored power from the day of driving, we were just fine for the second night of dry camping.

I was so happy that we found another quiet, dark, beautiful place to spend the night since the rest of this trip is fairly well planned. This morning when we woke, there were was still a bit of cloudiness, but by the time we got to Utah the skies were fresh and blue and clear.  We stopped at a nice little rest stop for a short walk before traveling east toward Salt Lake.

Sue on the trail at the I-80 rest stopMy turn to drive, and once again the Garmin Girl proved her stuff, taking us along Route 201 to Salt Lake City rather than directly along 80 to I-15.  I have driven through Salt Lake many times, and usually the traffic and congestion are horrendous.  This time, however, it was a breeze, and we flew right through the southern end of the city and up the Park City grade without a bit of trouble.  The grade was as long and steep as I remember, but the MoHo did just fine and traffic wasn’t terribly heavy so we were only slowed down once by trucks trying to keep moving in the two left lanes.

Once we were on I-84 we called brother Dan to see how the other 2/3rd’s of our caravan were doing.  They were just an hour behind us, having spent the night at the friendly Walmart in Mountain Home where Don was once stationed when he was in the Air Force. 

the rain is holding off for Roger and Dan to get set up at the Rock Springs KOAMo and I arrived in Rock Springs in time to stop in at the local Walmart for some RV toilet supplies before we drove back to the KOA where we had reservations for all three rigs for the night.  Within an hour Dan and Roger joined us and we all were set up in a row in three easy pull through sites with full hookups.  We could have easily boondocked another night, but when planning the trip, we were unsure of the weather, and with others in the group everyone decided that a hookup night would be good.  The Walmart here in Rock Springs already had some folks parked, and it seems that is one of the “ask to park” stores that welcomes RV’rs.

Oukrops in Rock SpringsWe had no campfire, but we all sat around the rug and caught up on our travels and already the family stories of kids growing up along the Columbia River in Oregon started making the rounds. I am sure that during the next few days we will hear many more of these kinds of stories, one of the more fun parts of family reunions.

day 2 and 3_056DSC_0056One more great surprise was in store for me.  Usually when Mo and I are on the road and my daughter Deanna is trucking somewhere we are one interstate off, or going the wrong way, or on the wrong side of the country.  Yesterday morning I called Deanna and told her we were on I-80.  She laughed and said,”Oh we are too, but we are way north of you”.  They were heading west from Ohio, and going deanna explaining to Mo how they tie down the enginesthrough Rock Springs !  I told her no matter what time it was to call me and she did.  At midnight, we got the call, and Mo and I snuck out in the Tracker to drive 4 miles up the road to the Flying J where I got to have a two hour cup of coffee with my daughter before she took over the driving the rest of the way west.

Hmm…coffee at 1 am?  We came home and I tried to go to sleep, but of course that was silly.  After awhile I thought that maybe processing photos and trying to blog a bit was better than lying there in the dark with my mind spinning!  Now it is after 5am, and soon we will be continuing our trek east toward Colorado.  Something tells me that I may need to doze a bit today while Mo drives, ya think??

Miles driven today: 365

Map Day 3

Back to the Desert

On I-80 between Winnemucca, NV and Wells, NV

night campWe have spent a lot of time this past year traveling the coast and the western valleys of Oregon and California.  Our little winter time jaunts to Desert Hot Springs require a lot of traveling south along interstates. One of the advantages of living in this part of Oregon is that the northern high deserts are just a skip away to the east. For this trip to Colorado, we decided to follow our infamous Highway 140, (the one we take to Medford all the time) due east toward Lakeview, over the Warner Mountains, and south to Winnemucca.

cow thoughtsAt the moment, we are on I-80 heading east from Winnemucca toward Wells, where we plan to find a resting place.  Interstate traveling at its mind numbing finest, but the visions of the last evening and this morning are still fresh in my mind.  We are on our way to a family reunion, and Mo’s brothers are traveling east this morning as well.  Original plans included all of us leaving this morning, and Roger and Nancy planned to come south to Rocky Point to caravan with us.  Instead, they traveled north to caravan with Dan and Chere, and pick up brother number three, Don on their way east past Umatilla, Oregon.

day 1 and 2_016DSC_0016Mo and I were almost ready to go on Saturday night, with only a mid-afternoon Sunday anniversary party to attend, and we looked at each other and said, “Why wait till Monday”.  The original plan also included a driving day of more than 500 miles, not something we were particularly excited about. Instead, we dropped in on the party, and dropped right back out again and were on the road by 2:30 Sunday afternoon.  Made for a bit more of a rush on Sunday morning, but well worth it. 

map day 1We haven’t traveled 140 east for some time, and spent much of our conversation trying to remember which routes we had taken on which trips and during which years!  What we both remembered, however, was that the road east of Lakeview was narrow, but quiet and beautiful and we knew there would be someplace where we could spend the night on the boonies.

day 1 and 2_029DSC_0029This route is the one we have taken a few times, visiting the amazing Hart Mountain Reserve, camping at the mysterious and magical Steens Mountains, and returning through the Sheldon Wildlife Refuge looking for wild horses.  We love the desert, and yet somehow we had forgotten just how much we love it.  The vistas opening out to nothing, the roads empty of anything but stray cattle, the spacious skies all make for spacious open mind thoughts, uncluttered.  Love that.

see the dust?!  That is one long cattle driveWe got gas in Lakeview, at $3.73 per gallon, after realizing that the next reasonable gas was more than 200 miles distant in Winnemucca.  Driving over the Warner Mountains was quick, and in no time we were dropping down the basalt canyons toward Adel.  The meadows opened up to the south of the highway, and a wide level pullover shaded by a single juniper called to us.  By 6:30 pm we were settled in with the slide open, the jacks down, and dinner in the skillet.  Both of us were happy to have an extra 150 miles under our belts so our Monday drive to Wells would be a manageable 350 miles or so.

yeah it is steep, yeah there is no shoulderThe silence was beautiful, and Mo and I just relaxed, and read a bit, talked a bit, and then started laughing when we couldn’t figure out what the animals outside our rig munching happily on the grass should be called.  I wrote to Jenna and hopefully she can answer me.  We called them cows, but then thought that cows are only females.  Then we had the conversation about what is a heifer, and what animal do you castrate to make a steer if it isn’t a cow, and it is obviously a boy..  We went down the lane with a cow moose, a cow buffalo, a cow elk, and the a cow cow, of course.  Then a bull cow?  like a bull elk?  This is the kind of silliness that can overtake at a boondock site in the middle of nowhere.  

leaving Oregon, into NevadaThe goal is to reach Rock Springs, Wyoming on Wednesday where we will hook up with the brothers and their rigs and camp with hookups at the KOA.  Then we will all caravan east toward Laramie, and then south to Lakewood and the rest of the family.  I would imagine this first night in the middle of nowhere in Eastern Oregon was possibly the quietest night we may have on the entire trip.  Our only sounds were the cows and a very occasional car passing by.  The stars were brilliant, even the ones low on the horizon, just as I remember from so many years ago at Hart Mountain.

map day 2This morning we were treated to high pink wispy clouds to greet the day, and then even a bit of rain between Denio and Winnemucca.  I haven’t seen rain in this part of the desert for a very long time, in fact, I don’t remember ever seeing rain in this part of the high desert.  I drove this morning, Mo took over at Winnemucca, and before long we will be hunting for another desert boondock site.

 

The Applegate Wine Trail

The Applegate Wine Trail (link)

Gayle, Sue, and Mo after that first wine flightapplegate wine trailI enjoy a good glass of wine, two buck chuck or a really fine glass of Pinot Noir, it’s all fun. I spent a lot of years in California, and went wine tasting with friends in the Napa Valley when tastings were free. I am certainly not educated about wine, and usually have to read the label to know what I am supposed to be thinking when I taste something. My palate is just barely sophisticated enough to recognize oak-ey, which I love, and a few others now and then. Going wine tasting always seems to be a bit more than I want to tackle on my own, and Mo and I will drop into a tasting room now and then if it isn’t pretentious and looks like fun.

Enter our neighbors and friends, Wes and Gayle. We couldn’t ask for better neighbors, but I am a bit sorry that they are only here in the summertime. The advantage of this is that we can visit their gorgeous Tucson home during the winter months if we get down that way. Having them here in the summer is great for selfish reasons as well, since they are our house sitters when we are gone and Wes does a mean job of taking care of the lawns.

first stop the Valley View Winery near RuchWes and Gayle know how to travel and how to have fun, and one of the things they do periodically is travel the Applegate Wine Trail between Medford and Grants Pass. We all decided to spend a sunny summer day together enjoying the beautiful vineyards and wineries on the Applegate. It was fun for us since Wes did the driving and they both know the area well, including which wineries we wouldn’t want to miss and which ones might be something to save for the next trip.

beautiful gardens at the Fiasco WineryI spent most of the day in awe of the incredibly gorgeous blue skies, with just enough puffy clouds to make it interesting, breathing in the fresh air and trying to capture the brilliance of the summery moments with my camera. I couldn’t capture the smell of the grape vines, and hard as I tried, I couldn’t capture the feel of the summer breezes filled with the fragrance of rich soil, moist riverbanks, lush flowers, and leaf heavy maples, oaks, sweet gums, and all the other unnamed deciduous trees we can’t grow on our side of the mountain.

so I did!  He really was a cheery guy and very knowledgeable.  The girl is studying at OIT in Klamath Falls but works here in the summerOf course, the happy ambience created by a few tastings of vino certainly added to the warm, fuzzy feelings that I carried around with me all afternoon. Spending time with good friends doing happy things was wonderful as well.

We started at the southern end of the valley, near Ruch, Oregon, just a few miles west of Medford and Jacksonville. Valley View Winery  was one of the first in the Applegate, and while the website says it was first established in the 1850’s, the attendants mentioned that when they opened their tasting room in the early 70’s they were one of only 4 wineries in the valley.  Now there are 20 and more coming every year.

inside the Fiasco Winery is a very nice raked gravel floorI discovered that the websites tell what the tasting room policy is for tasting fees, which might have been nice to know ahead of time.  Wes and Gayle thought that almost all the wineries they visited a couple of years ago had no fees, however things have changed as the Applegate catches up to the rest of the wine tasting world.  Still, a few had no charge for tasting, and a few refunded the tasting charge with a purchase, and the standard $5. fee was certainly less than the $25 and more fees in Napa or Sonoma.

While searching about for the winery links, I also found this little treasure about Tasting Room Etiquette.  Might have been a good idea to read this before we embarked on our day trip!

there is a book, After a lovely flight of whites and reds, and a purchase of a 2006 Anna Maria Cabernet, we ambled on down the road to the Fiasco   Winery.  I am not quite sure how the name came to be, but with another tasting fee and an attendant who wasn’t quite as personable, we decided that we were happy enough to check out the tasting room and move on to the next winery. 

The best part of Fiasco was the winery dog, and in their tasting room shop was a little book called “Every Winery has a Dog”, with some great photos and stories of the companion dogs that many wine makers seem to have.  We even met a few more as we continued on our way.

The prettiest winery, a new one called the Red Lily, just opened last fallWith a few stops in between, we came to the newer and incredibly lovely  Red Lily Vineyards .  Only opening their tasting room last fall, they have been making excellent wines for several years from their own vineyards around the valley. 

The grounds were gorgeous, and the attendants delightful.  We tried a taste of their beautiful and tasty Lily Girl Rose and decided it would be the perfect choice for our picnic wine for the day.  I am still wishing that I had purchased a few bottles of that lovely summer wine, but I’ll know where to find it.

Applegate Tasting (34)Gayle had come prepared with a wonderful spread of cheeses, crackers and flat breads, amazing gourmet pickles, olives and a feta olive oil garlic spread she had made, all with fine little dishes and pretty napkins.  The winery has a delightful picnic area by the river with shady tables and a bandstand for music.  They even provided us with a bucket of ice and glasses to enjoy our purchase with lunch.

Applegate Tasting (40)After our relaxing and tasty repast we ambled on up the highway to Gayle and Wes’s favorite winery, the big old barn housing the tasting room for  Bridgeview Vineyards and WineryWith no tasting fee here we enjoyed a flight of excellent, very reasonably priced wines, and discovered the great Pinot Gris and Dry Reisling that the valley had made famous.  After another purchase of some nice wines, I walked around in the vineyards trying once again to capture the feeling of that air and light.  Impossible.

and a winery catIn our happy haze ( the girls, not the driver!) we continued north along the east side of the valley to Wooldridge Creek Vineyards and WineryWe had all decided that perhaps we had tasted enough but that didn’t dampen our enjoyment of the beautiful grounds and tasting room.  Again we met a winery dog and  even a winery cat. 

admiring the gardens at Troon WineryPassing several more vineyards, we stopped in at  Troon Vineyard    to check out the digs and appreciate the beautiful gardens and vines.  Skipping the tastings for the rest of the afternoon was just fine.  After awhile it all starts to run together and I have no idea how you could keep on tasting all day.  Must take practice!

sharing good timesWe ended the afternoon at the Schmidt Family Vineyards , another of the oldest in the valley and possibly the most beautiful gardens of any of them. 

The tasting room was constructed in the old roundhouse for the railroad that once traversed the property and was gorgeous. 

perfect temperatures, lovely breezes, beautiful views, good conversationThe porches were cool and inviting, with views of the gardens and many comfy chairs and tables set about for relaxing with a glass of wine, or just relaxing and enjoying the conversation and the views.  Once again I tried to take photos of the breeze.  I am sure some great photographer knows just how to do this, but not me.  Still, when I look at the photo, I remember that warm breeze even if no one else has a clue. 

I took a LOT of photos, and if you want to check them out they are here

Here is the google map of our little day trip in case you are ever in Oregon and decide to do a little wine tasting in the lovely Applegate Valley.

our map with wes and gayleWe are now packing up for our three week jaunt to Colorado, South Dakota and Wyoming and by this afternoon the lush green of Oregon will give way to the wide open deserts of northern Nevada as we head east on curvy Highway 140 and then south to Winnemucca.  Yay!  We are on the road again!!

2012-07-19 Applegate Wineries

 

 

 

 

 

From the Heart

“It shifted from being written directly to my family and friends to something with more explanation and less from the heart, if you know what I mean. “ “paying too much attention to the reader community and not enough to my own preferences. “

DSC_0006 Words this morning from a trusted friend brought me up short. I know the feeling, and I fight it sometimes.  Case in point: my last post and this one.  There is enough going on around here that I have some things to write about, some life to share, and yet I found myself liking the way the last post looked so much that I didn’t want to upstage it with a new one that wouldn’t have those photos of my pelicans.  Now just how silly is THAT?!  Mo said, “Well, why don’t you just put the pelicans up on the header photo?”  Yeah, ok, I’ll do that, and yet the thoughts behind why I didn’t want to write a new post were still somewhat interesting to me. Sounds like I may be slipping into what this friend described in that last sentence I quoted in the first paragraph!

the lily in the cabin bed My Goal: write from the heart.  Write about stuff, explain stuff, but keep the heart in it.  Write as if I were writing to a trusted friend.  Of course, some stuff I wouldn’t even write to a trusted friend so I won’t write that part in here.  Those parts are saved for private journals that even my kids will never see. The good thing about this goal is that when I go back and read (and I DO go back and read my own blog), it will be entertaining and fun, and will help me remember not only what I saw and what I did, but how I felt about it.  At least that is the goal.

the hedge rose, blooming here at Rocky Point Personal journals, on the other hand, can be incredibly depressing to read later.  I journal a lot when I am angry, depressed, or just plain falling apart.  Not fun reading.  On another note, I don’t seem to have a lot of personal journaling going on now as I did when I was younger.  Life is less full of angst and worry and frustration.  I guess after 66 years, it is about time, right?

I think especially of this kind of “from the heart” writing when I think of Sherry’s story of David’s journey.  I have mentioned them often enough that anyone who reads my blog has probably found theirs. Good news today with 8 million stem cells in his collection!  Then, again from the heart, Laurie Brown’s eulogy to her Dad. Semi-True Tales of the Road has been one of those that stands out so far above so many of us that it is hard to see it wind down a bit. The only blog I read for years, I still always watch for a post from Laurie. Many folks mentioned her great campground reviews, but when I think of Laurie, I think of great food stories, seriously funny moments (aka Desert Hot Springs), and the clay oven. 

Merikay and Craig walking down to the docks from Rocky Point Resort Speaking of bloggers, last week brought us another blogger meet-and-greet treat, with Merikay and Craig visiting our world.  They spent a long time hiking the trails of Crater Lake, many that Mo and I who live an hour away have never traveled.  Then they camped a couple of nights right here in Rocky Point, giving us the chance to get Merikay and Craig out on Recreation Creek in the kayaks. 

OK Merikay, you can do it I love showing someone how much fun it is to get out on the water in a kayak and this was no exception.  We had a perfect day with water smooth as glass for our morning adventure.  Getting into a kayak for the first time can be a bit daunting, and once out on the water, it sometimes takes a few moments to get used to that wiggly feeling.  Within a short time though, that feeling goes away and your body settles into the balance much like it happens on a bicycle.  We had a nice, short paddle for their first run, and I do hope they will try it again.  It is such a great way to get up close to the birds and feel a silence on the water that is hard to find any other way.

A little benefit of blog meet-and-greets are the photos!  Loree has photos of Jeana on her blog since they met up as Loree traveled east, and we got a great photo of Loree on Jeana’s blog as well.  Now isn’t that just fabulous?!  Somehow the photos that others take of you are quite a bit different than the ones you might put up on your own blog.

DSC_0020 Later that afternoon I invited Merikay and Craig to the house for supper, along with our closest neighbors, Wes and Gayle, our Tucson friends who live here in the summer. We had appetizers on the porch, dinner inside at the dining table, and dessert back on the porch, all accompanied by a few different wines supplied by each of us.  I thoroughly enjoyed myself, especially since hostessing a meal is a favorite thing for me to do.  I was having so much fun I forgot to take photos of the table, the food, and my guests.  I guess that is a good sign.

Fourth of July was wonderful.  I do love the Fourth, not for any particularly patriotic reason, but for its ability to bring up happy childhood memories and to create small town joys. As I spent the morning making potato salad and meltingly perfect chocolate cupcakes, I remembered my foster mother, who loved all holidays and taught me to appreciate them with huge church picnics, decorations for everything, and always always great holiday food.

2012-07-04 Veterans Park Celebration (48) With Melody and family in town, Mo and I drove in for the celebrations.  Klamath Falls once again scheduled the holiday parade for 5 in the evening, ending in Veteran’s Park, where the fireworks were scheduled to go off at ten pm when it is finally dark here.  It is much nicer to have a later parade and only have to drive to town once.  When the parade was in the morning, it was harder to figure out what to do with ourselves while we waited for the fireworks twelve hours later.

Kevin and Elric for the sheriff's department This time, the parade was nice, but I still wish we could get more marching bands to come. There was only one.  Parades need music!  There were lots of red white and blue decorations, however, and the Shriner guys in their little cars always make a parade seem like the real thing. Of course, seeing my son in law and my grandson representing the Klamath County Sheriff’s department was a treat.  Kevin is a reserve deputy, and Elric got a big kick out of being in the cop car in the parade.  UhOh. Elric is now Xavier, but I keep forgetting.  I have no clue why teenagers think they have to change their names, but I am trying to get with the program. Seems to me that Elric is enough of an interesting name, but n-ooo-ooo. He has to make it more interesting! He is 13.  What can I say…

yum2012-07-04 Veterans Park Celebration (96) Hillary/Axel (remember that other name change I mentioned in the last post?) spent most of the time between the parade and the fireworks volunteering for the face painting booth.  Terrible me, I can’t remember what the booth was promoting, but it was some sort of socially redeemable venture, I am sure.  We had fun watching her and as the evening wore on, the line grew exponentially.  Word was getting around that she was painting some fairly radical faces, unlike the typical butterflies and such.  Well, with a name like Axel, who would expect butterflies anyway?

By the time the fireworks started, we were all starting to get fairly chilled, but the bugs weren’t out this year so that was a blessing.  Why don’t I remember that even if it is 90 during the day, the air will require sweats, jackets and even gloves by ten pm.  I hate to say it, but when the fireworks began we were pretty disappointed.  It may have been because of the high winds that evening, but once again the big booms couldn’t seem to rise above the trees lining the lakeshore at Veteran’s Park. 

2012-07-04 the Fourth It made for some interesting photos, especially with the full moon rising right where the big fireworks were exploding, but it also made for a few unhappy folks hanging around all evening waiting.  Next year we may just give it up and go check out the fireworks at Lake of the Woods, closer to home for us, but not part of that small town Klamath thing that we love. 

I guess the small town Klamath thing means there isn’t enough money for a big town fireworks show.